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Social Psychology
by David G. Myers 8th Edition

Introduction to Social Psychology

 

What is Social Psychology?

Definition:

The scientific study of how people   (1) think about, (2) influence, and (3) relate to one another.
 
How does social psychology differ from sociology and psychology?

What are the main areas of research today?

1. Social Thinking

2. Social Influence

3. Social Relations

What Are Social Psychology’s Big Lessons?

We construct our social reality

Our social intuitions are often powerful but sometimes perilous

Social influences shape our behavior

Personal attitudes and dispositions also shape behavior

Social behavior is also biological behavior

Social psychology’s principles are applicable to everyday life and other disciplines

Social Psychology: Related Disciplines & Levels of Explanation

Social Psychology and Human Values

Obvious ways in which values enter

          People attracted to the discipline

            Choice of topics

            Values as the object of study

Not-so-obvious ways in which values enter

The subjective aspects of science

Psychological concepts contain hidden values

There is no bridge from "is" to "ought"

 

Values

Is Social Psychology Just
"Common Sense"?

Hindsight bias

The tendency to exaggerate, after learning an outcome, one’s ability to have foreseen it

the I-knew-it-all-along phenomenon

 

How Do We Do Social Psychology?
Two General Categories of Studies

Correlational

Detecting Natural Associations

Observational Studies

Naturalistic

Laboratory

Surveys

Questionnaires

Interviews

Concerns of Correlational designs

Question wording

Third variables

Understanding Correlations

 

How Do We Do Social Psychology?
Two General Categories of Studies

Experimental Designs

To determine causation

Control

Random Assignment

Concerns:

Placebo Effects

Demand Characteristics

Solutions

Single and double-blind procedures

 

Understanding Experiments

Things to Consider in Social Psychological Research

Theory

Hypothesis

Population

Sample

Representative sample

Random sample

Random Assignment

Blind Procedures

Independent variable

Dependent variable

Survey

Placebo Effects

Third variables

Causation

Reliability

Validity